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Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)
administration running education programs for after being chancellor the university of colorado boulder people said was the first woman to be a the stage at a research university. i had a fight with ronald reagan even though i was a commissioner one of my latino women was the only other minority we would dissent when they would try to do something that was terrible. we had a big fight with him but i went to all of those. >>host: but president carter appointed you? >> yes. then there is a new department of education and i went back to teaching and that i was appointed. >>host: when did the clear it would be a permanent agency? >>guest: after the first year. the commission was set of sitting down to say we will just served, they did some hearings. the major power the commission has, when it does what it is supposed to do, it will listen to people and civil rights problems that they could not get anyone to pay attention. the federal government. nobody would pay attention. the first year they would go out and listen to the people. they have the power to subpoena any one. eisenhower said i want to
's education. people say that federal loans have card caps of $5,000-$7,000 per year. you can only borrow a total of $33,000 for undergrad. but that is not looking at the parent portion of the picture. the parent portion allows you to borrow as much as you need, to fill the unmet need, to pay your child's way to get to a particular school. there is a credit check that is very modest and there is not a check on income. but as costs have grown, perhaps the limits we have had on federal student loans do not meet the needs the students and families are experiencing when they are trying to pay for college. you see the growth in the program where more parents are borrowing from this program. recipients have doubled in the past decade, and they are borrowing more money as well. we thought it was emblematic of the shift in the system. >> would you say the apparent lack of paycheck is one of the most consistent missing pieces? if someone has an income of $10,000 a year, they can take out a loan for $30,000. >> if they do not have a negative credit history, and we could have a larger conversation a
of advocating for him -- jeanne appointed me to my first public role to advocate on an education commission. that is what got me familiar with the new hampshire legislature and ultimately led to my first run for office. >> carol, were you born aspiring for politics? >> i grew up in a large irish catholic family. my parents took in every child who needed it. we had three generations in the house. i was pressed into political service when i was 6 years old because my parents were active republicans. i carried the signs and whatever. i thought every family thought about religion and politics every night. what brought me to it is exactly what you hear the other women here talking about. i was an advocate. i started a nonprofit social- service agency. i did teach politics and history, so i kept the interest going, but it was really katrina that put me down this path. i came back and said, we can do better than this. that is what started it. a passion for change and to be an advocate. table share that. >> i hear you all talk about service -- when i was a girl, my mother was politically active, sh
and well. the things he has done, whether it is health reform or education reform, making higher education more affordable, expanding pell grants, creating the consumer financial protection bureau. they are all aimed at one thing -- to create a economy in which we have a vital middle-class and our tax policy reflects that as well. opportunity is broadly available. i think that is solidly in the mainstream of the democratic party. we can have a debate about means of achieving that, and i think we have to do some soul- searching about how in the 21st century we achieve those goals, and whether all the avenues and pathways that made sense 50 and 60 and 70 years ago are still valid today. many of them may be -- some may not. on the fundamental goals, he is solidly in the position of the democratic party, solidly progressive. i think that is a lot of what the election was about. >> in this election it has been observed that much of the advertising was predominantly negative. i would like to ask -- i know both sides of campaigns engaged in this. including an obama at that scene to insinuate that
to grow up. i feel like if you do these little things, in the education system from sixth grade through 12th grade every year -- everyone knows who george washington is, but you should have a class every year that allows you to live in a better neighborhood and allows you to buy a home, and giving people a credit, and allows them to get a car with a low-interest rate. guest: a real problem in american education is we are no longer in a position to require high personal standards. good example, when i was in college, i got a piece of paper when i was a freshman, i went to a state teachers college in new york state, wonderful institution. they said we expect our students and i read with to endure to my personal standards or we will throw you out of here. that's basically what the paper said. that then filters down. we don't have that anymore. instead we hear about people come from different backgrounds and different cultures. i came from different backgrounds and a difficult to prevent him from an italian immigrant family in new york city. my father was aborted or salesman. his father was a
of the epa. they talk about the cannot of education, the department of agency and epa waste of money. >> cost too much, all about regulations. are you one of the few people employed to this organization who has been to north korea. >> twice. i hope to go back again soon. >>> just ahead, a warning to democrats from republicans, they will not write a blank check to solve the fiscal cliff. reaction from debbie snab now of michigan, next. >>> plus, the best selling river of "gone baby gone" and mystic river" has a new crime to solve. where is his dog? dennis lahane is asking for help finding his dog tessa. [ male announcer ] it's that time of year again. time for citi price rewind. because your daughter really wants that pink castle thing. and you really don't want to pay more than you have to. only citi price rewind automatically searches for the lowest price. and if it finds one, you get refunded the difference. just use your citi card and register your purchase online. have a super sparkly day! ok. [ male announcer ] now all you need is a magic carriage. citi price rewind. start saving at citi
education and research and development, investing in clean energy and technology, investing in infrastructure and dealing with the deficits were more -- in a more balanced way. it was about what our obligations are to each other. it was about big things. those are very, very big things. i will say that, for all of the critique about whether our campaign was about big things or not, the preoccupations of people who write about that -- and i used to do that for a living -- i don't try to separate myself -- many of them are my best friends -- there is an awful lot of horse race coverage of this presidential race. there is such a preoccupation with who will win and who will lose and so little real interest in what the implications are. >> we were talking about pulling. >> public polling is so voluminous now. any to kids with an abacus can do a poll of the corner grocery store and some national news are in position will cover it as if it is news. and maybe the billion tommy pulled him out today. -- the billy and tommy poll came out today. it can be done sound yet they produce res
eye on 2016. okay, when we come back, from energy to education, to technology. our panel's pick for the good news story of the year. hmm, it says here that cheerios helps lower cholesterol as part of a heart healthy diet. that's true. ...but you still have to go to the gym. ♪ the one and only, cheerios olaf gets great rewards for his small business! pizza! [ garth ] olaf's small busins earns 2% cash back on every purchase, ery day! helium delivery. put it on my spark card! [ pop! ] [ garth ] why settle for less? great businesses deserve great rewards! awesome!!! [ male announcer ] the spark business card from capital one. choose unlimited rewards with 2% cash back or double miles on every purchase, every day! what's in your wallet? we don't let frequent heartburn come between us and what we love. so if you're one of them people who gets heartburn and then treats day afr day... block the acid with prilosec otc and don't get heartburn in the first place! [ male announcer ] e pill eachmorning. 24 hours. zero heartbur >> well, just when you thought there wasn't that much to cheer
to the aspirations of people for jobs, housing, health care, retirement security and the education of their children. we are still there, yet we're still pursuing wars abroad and doing military buildups. this is the direction america is going, and it is the wrong direction. >> congressman, your colleagues, your republican colleagues in the house have a different perspective. speaking on fox news, mike mulvaney of south carolina blamed the democratic-led senate for the impasse in negotiations on the so-called fiscal cliff while speaking on fox news. >> the house has extended these tax rates for everybody in the entire country, which is exactly the correct policy as we see it. the senate has refused to take it up. the senate could fix it today if they wanted to. but interest in while harry reid is in the well today and the senate complaining about mr. boehner, he has not this -- is not scheduled a discussion today on the fiscal cliff, which is absurd rid the house has done its job in the senate could fix this today if they wanted to. >> that was mike mulvaney of south carolina. >> it has to be transla
are admitted may face expulsion due to their faith. the fwa high institute for higher education -- the baha'i institute for higher education established after they were barred from attending other universities were declared illegal this year and six educators from that institute are currently imprisoned in iran. these are just a fraction of the injustices, mr. speaker, that the baha'is face at the hands of the iranian regime. the regime has sought to make life for the baha'i people simply unlivable. they seek to take things from everyday life. this resolution draws attention to their plight. it calls on the iranian regime toened its campaign of -- to end its campaign and it condemns them for the persecution of the baha'is and calls on the regime to immediately release the baha'is that it wrongfully holds in captivity, including the seven baha'i leaders and the six baha'i educators and it calls for the president and the secretary to make publicly -- to publicly express the same sentiments. finally, the resolution urges the president and the secretary of state to use measures already enacted
1981 to 1982 he served as assistant secretary for civil rights in the u.s. department of education and chairman of the u.s. equal opportunity commission from 1982 to 1990. he became a judge of the u.s. court of appeals and in the district of columbia circuit in 1990. president bush nominated him as associate justice of the supreme court and he took his seat on october 23, 1991. ladies and gentlemen please welcome justice thomas and professor amar to the stage. [applause] [applause] >> the thank you ladies and gentlemen for that extraordinarily gracious ,-com,-com ma warm welcome. thank you to the national archives and to the staff for making this event possible and thanks also, special thanks to the federalist society and the constitution accountability center and thank you justice thomas for being with us today as we marked the 225th earth day, 225th anniversary of our constitution. i guess i would like to start our conversation with the words of the constitution, we the people, and what that phrase means to you and how that phrase baby has changed over time thanks to amendments a
on 2016. when way come backna from -- when we6. come back from energy to c education, it is picked for the good news stories of the year. >>> well, just when you thought there wasn't all that much to cheer about in 2012, a panel is here with some good news. "wall street journal" editorial board member starts us off. what is your big good news of the year? >> it is a high energy story. >> just like you, high energy. >> basically we have through technology, the united states has discovered it has a huge amount of both shell oil and shell gas, and it can get it out of the ground. as i say thanks to technology. and that's not just a u.s. story. it is a north american story. there was a ton of oil in canada. there is the same geological formations in mexico. there is a lot of energy that can come upe'. the ceo of flor says there is at least $30 billion of potential c projects around the u.s. gulf of mexico. >> u people say by 2020 we could be self-sufficient in terms of providing most of the oil and the gas we get domestically. what are the implications of this for the larger economy?
's director of consumer education at credit.com. gerri, welcome. > > thank you. > what happened? > > there is a lot of frugal fatigue out there. we have been so careful with our spending for the past few years i think some consumers said "i deserve to buy myself something, not just other people gifts this year." so what we are seeing is, before the holidays, fico did a survey where they found that a slightly increased number of people said they would take three months or more to pay off their credit card debt that they plan to run up before the holidays. of course, now we have to see exactly what the numbers were after the holidays. but, generally i think that consumers are a little bit more optimistic with their spending this year. > why did this happen? we have been trained not to use our credit cards as much, not to max them out. why did this reverse itself? why do people feel so confident? > > we have seen a couple of trends when it comes to credit cards: we do see a lot of consumers who are using their credit cards to max out rewards, because the rewards programs, frankly,
without some investment in infrastructure or education and the like, our recovery may falter and then given what is going on in europe and much of the world, that would be bad news. i think the number one job is to keep us on good, sound, fiscal standing and he has to deal with some of these outstanding issues. then you move on and you start to see things like education and how we deal with education in this country and the need for reform continues to be out there. working with the education secretary, it is going to occupy a bitter moment for this president. americans believe in education and of the it is the first step on that ladder to upward mobility. that is going to be a challenge that this president has to deal with them than he has to find these issues and then define them in terms of common ground. host: juan williams joining us on this christmas day. joining us from texas, this is ken. go ahead. caller: good morning. merry christmas. i live in texas. the people in east texas -- i don't mean to say it, but white people really do not like this president. you can list
for months and years. i make plans for education in 2001 for the dutch government. i always follow something for inspiration. i saw last time that the democrats and republicans, the parties, they are working so good together to make something happen. host: you think the fiscal cliff debate is a good sign for the country? caller: absolutely, it is a good sign for the country. you know, america does not need money. america is money. america needs jobs. what kind of jobs? american jobs. what is on american jobs? to do the best and to bring the best things. that is the mayor, -- the america that i see. i seek some unity. i travel around the world. i see some the young americans everywhere. they become the best. host: from manitoba, canada, thank you so much for calling in. a few other stories we want to run through for you -- we will continue this discussion into the next segment. here is the story on federal workers getting a pay raise -- another story at what point you to, this from "the new york times" -- one other story i wanted to point out this morning, this from the new york daily news --
and neither highly educate and both of them made a very good living, but as a twist, when we look at labor, we have to look at how inclusive the labor unions are, and how much they advocate for people across race and gender, and we have to look at the strategy of labor unions in terms of is it about broadening the numbers of people who are participating in unios s or it is about protecting the interest of the feem who already have union membership? that is a critical case where when you talk about expanding the role of unions, you have to also talk about expanding the ranks of unions, because that is sometimes going to cut against the grain of cheollective bargaining rank for existing members, so without overcomplicating the things, we have to be aware that the overall percentage of american workers who have been unionized is slhrinking in part because o the destabilization of the market that is not educated. >> and the role of the union is a way to go broad and deep. and lord knows that the best paying jobs have nothing to do with having a ph.d. and stay right, there because we want to stay i
they're nuclear now, the next has to oneat that is welly educated in what is happening otherwise we will end up with muchween bigger benghazi proble. lou: imagine the constitutional referendum tomorrow. it will take some time for that to fully develop with support for president morsi's judgment for what it should look like. will he prevail, will h hear the end of the process possessed the powers he claimed for himselfocf meco for which he has since relinquished? >> unfortunately my answer will be, yes. president morsi of egypt has maneuvered,e need to go and get a strong message of note to the referendum but the other part of the opposition saying we want to boycott, so now they are divided, the result will be the muslim brotherhood, government of egypt will be most likely win this referendum. on the other hand the opposition is very strong in egypt, the return to the previous situation, so what i suggest the future is morsi will try to establish a referendum state in a very strong opposition for months and months for the regime innt egypt.nths lou: as we wrap up, professor, russia
. gregg: what do you think? >> i think i want to go after the whole legal educational complex. as a legal employer myself i can tell you that my heart goes out to anyone graduating law school right now. mr. sullivan wants to say that they are providing you a legal education, a socratic-type experience, that's fine. put that on the brochure. have it in big letters when you get the nice gloss see brochure and say look, we are not here providing you with the skills you need to actually pay back this $250,000 in debt we'll saddle you werement we are providing you with an educational experience and let the cards fall where they may. it's absolutely an ethical problem. to realize how wrong this is look at what goes on in medical schools. you don't see thousands of medical students graduating medical school with no prospect of employment. if the medical schools can calibrate the number of admission slots to the need for doctors why can't the a ba do the exact same thing. gregg: i did teach a law school class and what they represented to their students, and truth there is no resemblance. >> the d
. not yet a teenager, she dared to suggest that girls not only deserve but have a right to an education. >> i will get my education if it is in home school or any place. >> the taliban retaliated, hunting her down, shooting her in the neck and back. the attack outraged, even hardened pakistanis, and all around the world malala quickly became an international symbol of good against evil. today she is recovering in england. number one, president barack obama. >> tonight you voted for action. not politics as usual. >> after a long -- and we mean long and bitter campaign -- president obama won re-election. in 2012, the president also won the supreme court's stamp of approval for his health care reform program and made history with this statement. >> i think same-sex couples should be able to get married. ♪ >> as 2012 comes to a close, the president joined in grief with a community shocked by senseless violence. >> is these tragedies must ind. and to end them, we must change. >> brooke baldwin, cnn, atlanta. >> let's talk about another intriguing person. that would be santa claus because,
. in retrospect i wish we had done more. education is one that does not get covered nearly in the depth that it should be. that are always struggles to try to cover some of those stories. some of which are difficult, are better in print. >> how much pressure is there today to do entertainment as news? you know, lindsay lohan leading into the evening news or the superficiality of news. a lot of people's opinion of journalism has gone down in recent decades. is there a pressure for a president to kind of how much, what's the news versus entertainment quote a? >> sure. the first sort until in the book was a disagreement about the princess diana coverage why would you a primetime special after she died and peter thought it was a terrible mistake. he quickly came it and decided it was the right thing to do, but that was a constant battle i had within myself and we had within the newsroom or even in the company. that line has moved. it was interesting reading your cronkite book. those issues have been around from the beginning of television, even radio. even walter cronkite did some things th
fighting for the education of girls. 68,000 u.s. forces remain in afghanistan. is come a year after u.s. troop -- and a year after u.s. troops left iraq, more than 2,000 people died in ongoing violence. in italy, two americans were among 32 passengers killed when the costa concordia sank and the captain abandoned ship. the pope made a historic visit to mexico and cuba despite his frail health, the 85-year-old even began tweeting. across europe, anger over the failing economy spread as millions protested government budget cuts. ecuador granted asylum to wikilocations founder assange. if he takes one step out of this british embassy, they will arrest him. he faces sexual assault allegations in sweden and claims the u.s. wants to extradite him to face spy charges. team usa cammured 46 gold medals at the summer olympics in london. britain celebrated queen elizabeth's 60 years on the throne. and prince william and his wife kate announced a royal baby is on the way. en toa krause, cbs new -- tina krause, cbs news, london. >>> this new year's day marks 150 years for one of america's most fam
, things like healthcare and education are virtually free. but if you think the french have unlocked the door to paradise, don't start packing yet. [sewing machines whirring] the 35-hour work week, meant to create new jobs, hardly made a dent in unemployment, which still stands at over 10%. and not everyone is thrilled about working even 35 hours. corrine maier, a part-time employee for the state-owned electricity company, has written a book arguing that the french should work less or at least less well. >> the aim is to keep your job without working, or to do... [laughs] it's not to go higher. >> maier's best seller, bonjour, laziness, reveals her secrets on the art of pretending to work. let me read you the subtitle of your book. "the art and necessity of doing the least possible in a corporation." what is the art? >> because you have to be an actor. >> so you're performing? >> yes, you're performing. >> did you have any idea when you wrote this book that it was going to be so popular with french people? >> uh, no. [laughing] no. >> were you completely shocked? >> uh, yes, i'm very
that pay for education, food inspection, and air travel safety. nearly $55 billion. madam speaker, there is no more time and the american people are depending on us for a solution to avoid this fiscal cliff. thank you. i yield back. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman yields back. for what purpose does the gentleman from la rise? -- from louisiana rise? without objection. >> here we are on new year's eve, working to avoid this latest fiscal cliff. of course, if you wonder why we are here, just look at the fact that we shouldn't have to be here. back on august 1, this house with a bipartisan vote, passed the bill that would have avoided this fiscal cliff. it would have protected every american family from seeing a tax increase. mr. scalise: the bill passed on august 1 and it's been sitting over in the senate every day since then. here we are new year's eve and the senate's finally rolling up their sleeves and working to avoid this crisis. here we are in another crisis and unfortunately as we look towards this new year tomorrow, this is not the last time that we may be here. we
to bring together a diverse group of people to build operations in the state's public education and road shows over the coming months to talk about this to hear different voices, to get different people around a table talking about this. we have been lucky to have so much support in a bipartisan way, i believe is the only way we will get this job done. host: let me share a couple comments from our social media the deadline is today. guest: >> there's extraordinary measures. >> this is what it looks like. let's go to betty from carson, kansas, republican line. caller: good morning. thank you for c-span. i've been at this for many, many years. what is caused by a privatized war and no jobs available? no congressman, no president that can handle the generals like truman had to with his sign that said "the buck stops here." i am a republican, but i'm not proud of it at the moment. i think back to truman when he had to face macarthur, who said i'm going back to bhutan and i'm running for president and this and that. truman had the nerve to call him in and say, buddy, you are not going to do a
our children are being educated. we wouldn't think in a million years something like there would happen, that is the problem. gregg: state legislators might undertake a compensation fund and have people opt in. >> that may work like 9/11. gregg: and they should. arthur aidala, joey jackson, good to see you. >> happy new year. heather: the senate about to meet in minutes. they are saying there are signs are progress. we are tracking all the developments from the hill as they are happening this morning. >> the problem is spending money. mr. speaker the american people know this. why doesn't the federal government and congress understand it? why? because park ton is obsessed with spending someone else's money, it's the arrogance of power that congress spend the people's' money without regard to how this obsession affects those very people. heather: welcome back. we are hours away from new year's eve. make sure you ring it in with us. megyn kelly and hem and bill hemmer will be hosting all american new year's eve right here on the news channel. this time we have this four-time grammy
and cleleads uo a path in january. the agenda set out there in energy independence, education, what they want to do can still be well addressed. i believe it dmeepends on how t next few days work out. if they can't address the fiscal cliff, there's no way they can address the grand bargain or debt ceiling. i think they are going to do it, quite frankly. >> really, a pleasure talking to you both. enjoy the new year. you are enjoying family time and keeping your eyes on the redskins. i won't say which is which. happy new year. >> office politics the lester holt now. he tells us about two stories he will never forget. also, he will talk about his love of music. you know that little 50-pound thingy at the doctor's office when they weigh you, and they have to move it over? my doctor does not have to do that anymore. [ male announcer ] for every 2 pounds you lose through diet and exercise alli can help you lose one more by blocking some of the fat you eat. feels great. simple. effective. take that, 50 pound thingy. let's fight fat with alli. have a healthier holiday at letsfightholidayfat.com. [ bu
microdevices, it, too, is down 1 this morning, down 55% so far this year. online education company apollo group down 62% for the year, down again as of this morning. time to give you a couple of winners. start with bank of america, more than doubled this year, up 107%, it's up again right now, 10 cents higher. whirlpool up 110% this year up 41 cents. sprint nextel. up 137% this year, it, too, is up again this year and then pulte homes up 182% and yes, it is up again as of right now. the big losers all down, the big winners all up this thursday morning. then we've got facebook's founder, mark zuckerberg's sister, posts a private photo on facebook and sees it go public. she's not happy. what did she not understand about her brother's company? we'll discuss it. first, are things really as bad as the media makes it out to be john stossel says, no, they're not. this is one of my favorites. government cannot make man richer, but it can make man poorer, oh, yes, it can. ♪ [ male announcer ] at scottrade, we believe the more you know, the better you trade. so we have ongoing webinars and interactive
dumbs. they talk about the economy, jobs, the climate, education and things that matter and they don't use the kind of language that we use in our campaign because they're scared or turn off the voters in the middle. at the center that since we don't like mandatory anything now come to be a champion of the mega millions lottery where your ticket is your voting stock of coming and if you look at the last mega millions where people camped out three days in advance to be given to get a ticket where of course let's face it the chance of winning was less than being struck by lightning twice in a day put a few hundred million dollars into this and we will up their turnout significantly. i think they are an easier way to move in a direction and a lot of things can be done. we have to do some changes in the system including the filibuster. >> can i add a word? >> i fifa to questions go to get their. how to make it better and isn't it the public's fault after dhaka? i think they fit very well together. if you have a mismatch, if you have ideologically polarized parties operating in a separati
Search Results 0 to 32 of about 33 (some duplicates have been removed)